In Through the Out Door

 

Wait for it . . . That’s what Led Zeppelin made us do back in 1979. Like the long intro to the first cut, In The Evening, fans waited for over three years, the longest amount of time between Zeppelin albums, for this one to come out.

In Through the Out Door is a departure from the heavy metal we were use to hearing from the band. Released at the height of the punk and disco era, Zeppelin, like The Rolling Stones on Some Girls, embrace pop music, incorporating different styling and genres into this record to create a modern, more diverse, sound for the time.

Interesting photography and package design created and further fueled the mystique that surrounded the band. In Through the Out Door would become Zeppelin’s unintentional Swan Song following the death of John Bonham. In many ways, like Who Are You, it marks the end of the 70’s and an era that many think was the greatest in Rock & Roll.

There were a total of 6 different album covers, packaged within two brown paper wrappers. The black & white inner sleeve could be colorized by lightly spraying water, to reveal pastels. Click Here to see them all. It’s an interesting story.

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2 thoughts on “In Through the Out Door

  1. Simply put, this is a rocking album. However, more than that, the coantrst between this album and my 1975 album perfectly illustrates Chris and I’s musical relationship for pretty much the entirety of our lives. Thus, it is a perfect follow up. For as long as I can remember, Chris has constantly reminded me that rock and roll gets the juices flowing. Jazz may inspire. Blues may relate. Country may hit home. Rap may groove. Folk may root. Classical may challenge. But it is rock and roll that drills into our marrow and makes us move, shake, rattle it seems that this album has a consistent theme of movement.The opening track by Aerosmith perfectly illustrates this. Tyler’s screams and Perry’s guitar fuse to push the listener to get up and move. The driving second track by Alice Cooper darkly coantrsts by sending us out of the saddle and to hell. Nevertheless, it sends us somewhere. Bowie, an artist in so many ways, pushes us through 12 minutes of reflection on where we are going. Beck chaotically disrupts this reflection. AC/DC’s bluesy Ride On encourages us to get out of our funk and succeeds. As for God of Thunder , well, it just is rock (and you are right Chris, disappointedly not scary). The Thin Lizzy track returns to a marching, guitar driven scene of battle. Led Zeppelin brings on a trip of different kind. Tom Petty’s is emotional. The final trip from Blue Oyster Cult is, well, final.Luckily, however, I am able to conclude the post with, More cowbell!

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