Led Zeppelin IV

Led Zeppelin IV

 

I know why people like to listen to “Classic Rock”. It’s like seeing an old friend, and when it’s one you haven’t seen in a while, even better.  You’re comfortable, you talk, laugh, finish each others sentences. You know what’s coming, what buttons to push and when to let off the gas. Led Zeppelin IV is like that. It’s like an old friend. You sing along with it, word for word, and you know when, and where, “the levee breaks”. The guitar, drums and bass will never let you down, and after a listen, it’s hard to say goodbye, but in the end, when it’s over, “crying won’t help you and praying won’t do you no good…”

“Go to Chicago!”

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Disintegration

 

Disintegration is one of the Cure’s deepest darkest remedies. The musical equivalent to chemotherapy, this album is a nest that houses and systematically unleashes its creepy crawlers that move across your body in a beautifully sick lullaby.

“and i feel like i’m being eaten by a thousand
million shivering furry holes and i know that in
the morning i will wake up in the shivering cold
and the spiderman is always hungry…”

The Cure was one of the few dark and brooding 80s bands out of England which actually broke thru to the mainstream enough to fill large arena style venues, so when they descended on Chicago’s Poplar Creek like vampires in the mid 80s of course I was right there in the front row choking on dry ice, and the $35 price per ticket, which at the time was a blood letting.

For me though, this band and the album will always be associated with rhythmic dance underground somewhere near the corner of Clark and Addison down on Fascination Street.

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Led Zeppelin III

Led Zeppelin III

 

On Zeppelin III Page switches brushes and paints broad acoustic pastels across the hard, pounding canvas provided by Bonham and Jones to create a raw bluesy English folk album with spunk. It still has its rocking moments, but Led Zeppelin III has texture and depth that reaches past just volume to engage. Throw in some signature wails and howls from Plant and it’s an absolute delight and one of my favorites from the band.

 

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Led Zeppelin II

Led Zeppelin II

 

If the first Led Zeppelin album is the birth of heavy metal, then this one is stage two, fueled by the booster rockets of the first cut Whole Lotta Love. I forgot just how heavy this record was (still is) and it amazes me that it came out over 40 years ago. If you think back to then, Rock & Roll, “that loud music that the kids are listening to” was the White Album from the Beatles, or Crosby, Stills & Nash, or even The Doors/The Soft Parade. Compared to those albums, this must have sounded like an atomic bomb going off. And if it was played the way we played it in my basement 10 years later, it isn’t a wonder some ceiling tiles got busted, and some “good times, bad times” were had by all. I especially like the Tolkien reference on Ramble On.

Enjoy!

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Physical Graffiti

 

This weekend’s Runner is Led Zeppelin’s mammoth serving Physical Graffiti. I liken this album to eating an entire box of those little chocolate doughnuts (disc one), chased down by a tall cool glass of Jack Daniels (disc two), immediately followed by a long nap on the floor.

Just be careful it doesn’t turn into a dirt nap!

 

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Let’s Stick Together

 

Wine is sweet and gin is bitter, drink all you can but you won’t forget her. You talk too much, you laugh too loud. You see her face in ev’ry crowd.

Kiss one girl, kiss another, kiss them all, but you won’t recover. You’re dancing slow, you’re dancing fast, you’re happy now, but that won’t last.

A debt you pay in tears and pain, the price of love, the price of love. It costs you more when you’re to blame.

Bryan Ferry – Let’s Stick Together – 1976

chef d’oeuvre

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