But Seriously, Folks

 

Today’s runner, an acoustic daydream.
Slip’in slide guitar on a lazy hot summer day.

“I can hear thunder, far away…”

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The Doobie Brothers

 

No mega hits from this Doobie, just a nice easy buzz all the way through.

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Frampton’s Camel

 

In the mid seventies Peter Frampton came alive on the strength of albums like Wind Of Change and Frampton’s Camel. The studio versions of his biggest hits may seem a little soft when compared to how they sounded live, but they are familiar and it’s interesting to hear these intimate almost acoustical versions of his big closers like Lines On My Face and  Do You Feel Like I Do. They sound fresh, and here they are surrounded by additional gems like the funky I Got My Eyes on You, and the chorally mantric I Believe.

This is a solid album, real “Classic Rock”. Enjoy!

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Manifesto

Today’s Runner is Roxy Music’s 1979 Manifesto. A delicious mardi gras of sound that carousels to a peak, and gradually decays to a quiet intimate conclusion. Anyone who has ever thrown a really big party will relate to the beautifully drunken, melancholy imagery that closes the album.

“Now the ballroom’s empty, everybody I have known, has been and gone. With the music over, here am I, a shadow echo-ing on. Spin me round…”

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The Velvet Underground

 

House band of Worhol’s creative lair the Factory, the Velvet Underground sound was the backdrop for his sixties POP art movement. If you were around and in the Big Apple at the time, and you liked drugs, sex, and art, this is what you would be listening to on any given night in this shady bohemian underworld. Of course you wouldn’t be reading this because you’d probably be dead, as most that frequented it now are.

Every excess was considered a success. It was a time of experimentation and exploitation; although the music here is pretty straight forward rock & roll. It’s very stripped down, and both lite and wonderfully dark.

If I could make the world as pure and strange as what I see
I’d put you in the mirror I put in front of me
Linger on your pale blue eyes…

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